Magnesium for Sports & Fitness

Magnesium
Magnesium: Main Image

How Much Is Usually Taken by Athletes?

Magnesium deficiency can reduce exercise performance and contribute to muscle cramps, but sub-optimal intake does not appear to be a problem among most groups of athletes.1, 2 Controlled trials suggest that magnesium supplementation might improve some aspects of physiology important to sports performance in some athletes,3, 4 but controlled and double-blind trials focusing on performance benefits of 212 to 500 mg per day of magnesium have been inconsistent.5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 It is possible that magnesium supplementation benefits only those who are deficient or who are not highly trained athletes. 11, 12

Side Effects

Comments in this section are limited to effects from taking oral magnesium. Side effects from intravenous use of magnesium are not discussed.

Taking too much magnesium often leads to diarrhea. For some people this can happen with amounts as low as 350–500 mg per day. More serious problems can develop with excessive magnesium intake from magnesium-containing laxatives. However, the amounts of magnesium found in nutritional supplements are unlikely to cause such problems. People with kidney disease should not take magnesium supplements without consulting a doctor.

Interactions with Supplements, Foods, & Other Compounds

Vitamin B6 increases the amount of magnesium that can enter cells. As a result, these two nutrients are often taken together. Magnesium may compete for absorption with other minerals. Taking a multimineral supplement avoids this potential problem.

Interactions with Medicines

Certain medicines interact with this supplement.

Types of interactions:beneficial= Beneficialadverse= Adversecheck= Check
dnicon_BeneficialReplenish Depleted Nutrients
dnicon_BeneficialReduce Side Effects
dnicon_BeneficialSupport Medicine
dnicon_AvoidReduces Effectiveness
dnicon_AvoidPotential Negative Interaction
dnicon_CheckExplanation Required